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6650 Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19135

Monday, 20 January 2020 00:00

A wound is considered to be a laceration. Patients who are dietetic may be familiar with the possibility of getting wounds on the feet. If these are not promptly treated, an infection may develop, and can potentially be a serious condition. Wounds on the feet may be less serious for people who are not diabetic, and minor wounds may be treated with surgical tape. Research has indicated the importance of keeping the wound and surrounding area dry and clean, as this may help to prevent an infection. If you have any type of wounds on the feet, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with John M. Fanelly, DPM from Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 13 January 2020 00:00

Elderly people may have difficulty in maintaining proper foot care. This may be a result of being unable to bend down to correctly trim the toenails. Additionally, it may be challenging to wash and dry the feet thoroughly, which may lead to the development of painful foot conditions. Seniors may have trouble seeing any existing wounds on the feet, and the skin may become dry and cracked. It may be beneficial if a caregiver can help older people to properly manage everyday foot care by gently massaging their feet, followed by using a moisturizing lotion. If you have questions about how to take care of elderly feet, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist.

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact John M. Fanelly, DPM from Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and Their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet and can hide many life-threatening medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Sunday, 12 January 2020 00:00

Living with foot pain is hard on your body.  Give us a call and let us find out what's wrong.

Monday, 30 December 2019 00:00

Because the feet are the foundation of the body, and carry your weight on a day to day basis, it is important to make sure you are keeping the muscles strong. To help maintain a healthy, strong foot structure, it is recommended that you perform foot stretches. One simple exercise you can practice consists of sitting on the floor with your legs stretched out and wrapping a towel around the balls of your feet. Once comfortable, begin pulling your toes towards your body while keeping your knees straight, and repeating this motion 3 times for each foot, while holding for 30 seconds. Another exercise you can practice to build strength involves sitting in a chair, and with your heel on the ground, picking up a towel with your toes. Adding these simple exercises to your daily routine can help benefit the overall health of  your feet. If you would like more ideas on how to stretch the feet, we suggest you speak with a podiatrist for professional tips and recommendations.

Why Stretching Is Important for Your Feet

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with John M. Fanelly, DPM from Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first to determine if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous exercise, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising to ice and rest the foot. It is advised that you then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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