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6650 Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19135

July 2021

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Signs of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

The tarsal tunnel is a narrow pathway in the ankle that serves as an opening for nerves, veins, arteries and tendons to pass through. When the tibial nerve gets squeezed or compressed in this opening, tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs. There are a variety of factors that can lead to this compression, such as a mass or cyst, swelling, trauma or an injury to the ankle, or rolling the ankle inward while walking. Patients who are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome will notice a burning foot pain as well as an aching, numbness or tingling sensation around the arch and sole of the foot. Patients who believe that they may have tarsal tunnel syndrome should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact John M. Fanelly, DPM of Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

Warming Up Before Running Is Important

It is common for people who are new to running to skip warming up, while increasing mileage and intensity. This can lead to possible foot conditions developing, which can cause severe pain and discomfort. It is beneficial to start an effective warm up by walking for several minutes. Additionally, it may help to incorporate cycling with a light jog, and this may adequately prepare the body for an intense run. Maintaining cardiovascular health can be accomplished by alternating challenging workouts with lighter ones, which may give the body appropriate recovery time. Ankle sprains and torn ligaments may be avoided when a proper warm up and cool down is frequently performed. If you would like more information about how the feet can be affected by running injuries, please speak with a podiatrist.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact John M. Fanelly, DPM of Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 06 July 2021 00:00

Why Do I Have Blisters on My Feet?

Most blisters form on the feet due to friction. As you walk, your shoes or socks may rub against a small area of skin, damaging it. A pocket of fluid builds up underneath the damaged skin to shield the deeper layers of skin from further damage. Friction blisters are best left alone and footwear and activity modifications are often adequate for treating symptoms and preventing future blisters. However, not all foot blisters are caused by friction. Blisters can also occur on the feet due to allergic reactions, exposure to certain chemicals, skin conditions like eczema, frostbite, sunburn, and fungal, viral, or bacterial infections. If you frequently have blisters on your feet, a podiatrist can help you determine the cause of your blisters and find the best treatment for you.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact John M. Fanelly, DPM of Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Thursday, 01 July 2021 00:00

What Is a Bunionette?

Bunions appear as a bony lump at the main joint of the big toe when the big toe turns towards the other toes. A Tailor’s bunion, or bunionette, is the same thing but occurs at the base of the little toe. Tailor’s bunions are often a result of a faulty mechanical structure. As the little toe shifts inwards, the metatarsal bone begins to stick outwards. Tailor’s bunions are often indicated by redness, swelling, and pain, and they usually become irritated by shoes that are too narrow in the toes. Patients who believe that they have a Tailor’s bunion should consult with a podiatrist for a proper treatment. Nonsurgical treatment options include shoe modifications, padding, icing, orthotics, or injection therapy. In more severe cases, a podiatrist may need to perform surgery on the bunionette.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact John M. Fanelly, DPM of Northeast Philadelphia. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Philadelphia, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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